Working with the Media During Your Company’s Public Crisis

The video above issues my invitation to work with your organization on site–to prepare you for dealing with the media constructively during your company’s public crisis situation. As you note, I encourage you to call me today, so we can discus when I will come to your organization to provide this vital training.

Call me: 678-316-4300

Also, here are other resources that will help you cooperate with media representatives more productively:

ESSENTIAL STEPS FOR DEALING WITH THE MEDIA DURING A CRISIS

http://ezinearticles.com/?Essential-Steps-for-Dealing-With-the-Media-During-a-Crisis&id=8567756

HOW TO WRITE PRESS RELEASES THAT GET MEDIA ATTENTION
http://www.businessknowhow.com/marketing/release.htm

BECOME THE IDEAL RADIO OR TV GUEST

http://www.businessknowhow.com/marketing/tvradioguest.htm

SELF DEFENSE TACTICS OF POLITICAL SPEAKERS
http://www.businessknowhow.com/growth/political.htm

BREAK INTO PRINT WITH LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
http://ezinearticles.com/?Break-Into-Print-With-Letters-to-the-Editor&id=2028721

CNN ANCHOR’S ADVICE ABOUT SPEAKING
http://www.businessknowhow.com/growth/conversational.htm

ENDORSEMENT FOR MY MEDIA TRAINING SEMINAR
Shortly after I directed my seminar–“How to Work with the Media During a Crisis”–participant Margie Asef wrote this:

Bill’s informative seminar provided a rich array of ideas and resources to prepare for media communications during a “never-invited” crisis. I hope I’ll never have to use any of the skill set, but I’m better prepared if I do. Thanks Bill!margieasef
Margie Asef, Community Relations Manager,
Greater Atlanta Christian School

RESPOND WITH YOUR COMMENTS
I will welcome your comments. Click the comments link above the video.

GET DAILY COMMUNICATION TIPS AND STRATEGIES FROM MY FACEBOOK BUSINESS PAGE

Here’s the link to my Facebook business page:
http://bit.ly/iRv6EA

You’ll find beneficial guidelines for business communication and for speaking with “poise, power, and persuasion.” Click “Like” to stay connected for updates.

Four Media Relations Lessons from Damon Evans’ Case

Joel Williams, Veteran Broadcaster at WDUN-AM

When Katie Highsmith’s temporary illness prevented her from hosting her regularly scheduled Monday morning interview with me in “The Local Hour”–aired daily on WDUN-AM 550 in Gainesville, Georgia–her colleague Joel Williams took over.

Joel and I had worked together before extensively, when he produced a three-times a week communication program I hosted for a year. Because of his help on that and other projects, I said this about him in the Acknowledgments section of my book, The Complete Communicator: Change Your Communication, Change Your Life! “Joel Williams helped me through his coaching, technical expertise, and influence. He’s a premier announcer I am proud to know and work with.”

Joel called to ask me, “What are the major media relations lessons we have learned from the Damon Evans case?”

For background information: Damon Evans became the youngest Athletic Director ever at the University of Georgia at age 34.  Now, six years later, he became involved in a highly publicized scandal. His lofty credibility tumbled when he went to jail in Atlanta on June 30, charged with a DUI. An added problem–Evans, a married man with two children, was in the car with a 28 year old female passenger, Courtney Fuhrmann, whose red panties the officers spotted in Damon’s lap.

The next afternoon, July 1, Evans held a press conference on campus, apologizing and promising that he would work diligently to rebuild trust in his leadership. However, public pressure (especially from irate bloggers) mounted to fire Evans, especially since he had been a strong advocate for avoiding drinking while driving. President Michael Adams accepted Evans’ resignation on Sunday, July 4th. . .an ironic date for declaring independence from a university he had attended–playing football for the Georgia Bulldogs after a stellar athletic career at Gainesville High–and then served at a top administrative level.

With that background in mind, I invite you to listen to Joel’s interview with me about “Four Media Lessons from Damon Evans’ Case.” Our fifteen minute conversation is packed with vital practical advice about Crisis Communication–a seminar I have taught for various organizations.

I encourage you to share these four media lessons with your management team and other employees. Discuss how you will react when your business enters the spotlight–with bad news. Then you will be ready to retain your credibility–and your customers.

BRING ME TO YOUR ORGANIZATION FOR MEDIA RELATIONS TRAINING
When you’re ready for a communication expert to assist you with your media plans, check the description of my “Media Magic” seminar by scrolling down this page on my Web site:
http://tinyurl.com/ktgoqr

Then call me at 678-316-4300 to discuss how my crisis communication training will help your organization prepare adequately for widespread media exposure during troubled times.

LISTEN TO JOEL WILLIAMS’ INTERVIEWING ME
Now, to hear my interview with Joel, click the arrow below in the Podcast section of this blog page, located just above the Audio MP3 lettering.

ADD YOUR COMMENT
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